Sunday, 2 December 2007

Who Next?












By Fatmir Terziu
... National football team has been under fire for the last three matches of the qualifying tour for Euro 2008. It reflected in Albanian politics. For the first time in history the information about the possibility of the matches being sold, brought a political debate. The Albanian Prime Minister was very aggressive in his declaration, and called for the National Team to be disbanded. Erion Brace of the SP was against this, declaring the PM declaration as absurd. In the meantime the Albanian minister of Culture and Sport has written to FIFA to investigate the claims. One of the top goal-scorers of the national team, Bushi, also disagrees with the PM. If we borrow Kadare’s phrase, the next coach of the Albanian national team, will be ‘General of a dead army’...

With England, a major footballing nation, failing to qualify for Euro 2008, a debate has arisen. Having previously employed Sven Göran Eriksson as manager, the English FA, opted for Steve McLaren as his replacement, when the Swede failed to take England beyond the quarterfinals of a major international competition. McLaren, a home-grown manager, however, did worse: failing to qualify for Euro 2008. And so, a debate has risen in England about who McLaren’s replacement should be, after he was sacked following England’s defeat at Wembley, to Croatia.
With the prospect of a lucrative wage, there is a large list of contenders for the position of the next England boss. However many fans want the position to be filled by an Englishman instead of a foreign manager, such as Jóse Mourinho or Fabio Cappello; believing that England should be managed by one of their own. On the other hand, English managers do not have a proven track on the top level. For example, many do not see Harry Redknap, the leading English contender on the same rank as Jóse Mourinho. So, should the next England boss be English? To answer the question, other national teams should be observed.
First there is Italy, the reigning World Champions. Italy has always had an Italian manager, and has had a lot of success over the years, having won the World Cup four times. But McLaren could not do with England what Marcelo Lippi did with Italy in 2006.
Then there are the reigning European Champions, Greece, who were lead by a German manager, and defied the odds to lift the European Cup in 2004. So the knowledge of a foreign boss helped Greece to success they probably would not have achieved had they been managed by a Greek manager.
On the other hand, there is Greece’s neighbour, Albania. Having never had a foreign manager, they opted for Hans Peter Briegel, a German, in 2005, but to no gain. More recently, they appointed Otto Baric, who started well, inspiring Albania to a friendly win against Greece on his first game, just after they had been crowned European Champions. The Albanian fans were expectant from then on, but Baric failed to deliver, and Albania failed to qualify for Euro 2008 miserably. So for Albania, another foreign manager had failed to live up to expectation. Furthermore Albanian National football team has been under fire for the last three matches of the qualifying tour for Euro 2008. It reflected in Albanian politics. For the first time in history the information about the possibility of the matches being sold, brought a political debate. The Albanian Prime Minister was very assertive in his declaration, and called for the National Team to be disbanded. Erion Brace of the SP was against this, declaring the PM declaration as absurd. In the meantime the Albanian minister of Culture and Sport has written to FIFA to investigate the claims. One of the top goal-scorers of the national team, Bushi, also disagrees with the PM. If we borrow Kadare’s phrase, the next coach of the Albanian national team, will be ‘General of a dead army’.
Foreign managers may not always bring success to a national team, but neither does being patriotic. In England’s case they ought to go for a proven manager this time, who might just bring the best out of the English players. The FA already made the catastrophic decision of being patriotic, when they chose Steve McLaren. That is why most probably, the next England manager will be foreign. The real question is: The Special One or The Italian One?
_______________________________________________________
JA NJE NGA PROJEKTET E Diakonia Agapes.

PROJEKTI GOMAR

OPERATION 'GOMAR'


In 1999 Dissident Editions proposed to "Friends of Albania" (Miqte e Shqiperise) in England a modest project on behalf of the donkeys (gomere) of Albania, a country where veterinarians and veterinary services are very few.

As a result of initial and anonymous funding by Dissident Editions, further cash was raised by the secretary and organiser of FoA, Miss Primrose Peacock. Veterinarians from England and Austria kindly offered their services at no cost, and, eventually, the Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad (SPANA) sponsored a Scottish veterinarian and offered literature in Albanian, tools and pharmaceuticals.

The very wealthy British charity, The Donkey Sanctuary, refused to help the project in any way.

Zyra Diaconia Agapes ne bashkepunim me organizaten angleze BESA: Miqte e Shqiperise organizon ne zonen e Shpatit Projektin 'GOMAR'.

Tre specialiste nga Anglia, Zelanda e Re dhe Austria do te trajtojne kafshet tuaja te punes (gomere, mushka, kuaj) per probleme te ndryshme qe kafshet mund te kene si probleme me thundrat, demtime nga samari probleme te gojes etj.

Jeni te mirepritur me
DATE 10 TETOR 2000
ORA 9.00 ne Gjinar.

Ju faleminderit!


Notice posted at Gjinar by Diakonia Agapes.

From the 9th to the 13th of October 2000, the veterinarians and their facilitators both Albanian and foreign worked and spoke in five villages around Elbasan in central Albania: Balez, Gjimar, Gjergjan, Thane and Paper. They were ably assisted by veterinarian staff from Elbasan and Tirane and by workers for Diakonia Agaphy (Diakonia Agapes: Service of Love) in Gjinar.

Much local interest was aroused, and many owners of donkeys (as well as horses and mules) turned up at the advertised places at the appointed times. They were obviously fond of their equines, and anxious that they have their teeth looked at and seen to, that they be inspected for parasites, and so on.

The following pictures were takern by the organizer,
Primrose Peacock.


At Gjinar, 11.00 in the morning.


Austrian veterinarian, Edmund Hainish at Gjinar.


A loving owner and a patient at Gjinar.


English veterinarian Neil Rudram at Balez.


New Zealand veterinarian Ian Dacre examining teeth at Paper.


The river-bank near Paper


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